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Employment consequences can come from criminal charges

| Feb 13, 2020 | Firm News

Criminal charges can make various aspects of life challenging, but things can become even more complex if you’re convicted. One area that’s particularly difficult for people to handle is the way that it can affect their employment.

Many employers do criminal background checks before they hire employees. For some, any criminal conviction is an automatic disqualifier. This isn’t always the case, and some employers prefer to consider the circumstances of the criminal conviction before they lose someone who can be a valuable asset to the company.

Why does criminal history matter?

For some jobs, criminal history matters because it could signal that a person might pose a danger to clients or even other workers. The jobs that a criminal conviction might impact usually have to do with handling assets or dealing with vulnerable individuals. For example, a person convicted of child abuse couldn’t hold a job as a daycare teacher. A person convicted of identity theft likely can’t become a banker.

Many employers consider the duties of the employee when they determine whether they can hire a person who has a criminal history. Not only do they consider the type of charge the person has, they will likely also think about whether the person completed their sentence and how long it’s been since the conviction.

How can people minimize the employment risks?

Sometimes, employers are more likely to allow a current employee to remain if they’re convicted than they are to hire a person who has a criminal conviction. For this reason, a person who’s facing charges might opt to speak to their employer to determine what options they have.

There are some industries that would require that a person who’s convicted of a criminal charge resign or be terminated. This might be the case if there is an issue with the person retaining a necessary license. It’s also possible for times when a driver’s license is needed but the person is unable to have one.

People who are facing criminal charges might be able to minimize the impact their case has on many aspects of their life, including their employment options. Some opt to pursue a plea deal that offers a reduced charge, while others fight the charge. Learning what options you have for attempting to minimize what you have to deal with might be beneficial for various aspects of your life.